CYHOEDDIADAU

Yn ogystal â'r cylchgrawn Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies, mae CMCS yn cyhoeddi rhychwant o lyfrau ar bynciau Celtaidd. Ar y tudalen hwn ceir manylion amdanynt.

Os ydych chi am archebu unrhyw un o'r llyfrau a restrir isod, gofynnwn yn garedig i chi argraffu a chwblhau'r ffurflen archeb.

book cover

Addasiad angyhoeddiedig mewn Cymraeg Canol o hanes Lladin Sieffre o Fynwy yw Liber Coronacionis Britanorum ('Llyfr Coroni'r Brythoniaid') sy'n canolbwyntio ar olyniaeth brenhinoedd a breninesau Prydain o Brutus lawr i Wrtheyrn, Arthur, a Chadwaladr. Golygwyd y testun gan Patrick Sims-Williams o lawysgrif o tua'r flwyddyn 1500, lle mae lluniau — am y tro cyntaf yng Nghymru — yn cyd-fynd â'r naratif. Cynhwysir pob un o'r 59 llun lliw yn eu lleoedd priodol, a defnyddir naw copi anghyflawn, un ohonynt gan un o gefnogwyr Llywelyn ap Gruffudd (m. 1282), i lenwi bylchau yn y testun. Diolch i'r golygiad hwn, bydd darllenwyr modern yn gallu mwynhau'r gwaith hwn a'i luniau unigryw am y tro cyntaf.
Cyhoeddwyd 2017

“The text might well be regarded as the Cinderella of the Brutiau, being perhaps the longest Middle Welsh text that has remained unpublished.” — Medium Aevum

“It is one of only two Welsh manuscripts to contain a planned series of miniatures to illustrate the text and the only one of the two containing a vernacular text... This groundbreaking publication firmly establishes the Liber Coronacionis Britanorum as a distinct version of Brut y Brenhinedd, as well as making accessible an important but too-often neglected manuscript” — Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie

book cover

Liber Coronacionis Britanorum ('The Book of the Crowning of the Britons') is a Middle Welsh adaptation of Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain. In this companion to his edition Patrick Sims-Williams investigates its relationship to Geoffrey's Latin original and the other medieval Welsh translations, providing a full explanatory commentary and a study of its language. The cover picture (from National Library of Wales, MS Peniarth 23, fol. 61r) shows the boy Myrddin (Merlin) advising King Gwrtheyrn (Vortigern) about the buried dragons.
Cyhoeddwyd 2017

“L'ouvrage constitue une étude précieuse sur le plus long texte en prose du moyen-gallois” — Études celtiques

“Volume II provides an excellent introduction in English, including the text's relationship with Geoffrey's Latin original, a description of the manuscript evidence, and an exhaustive textual commentary.” — Medium Aevum

book cover

Yn Welsh Genealogies A.D. 1500-1600 (WG 3) y mae Dr Michael Siddons yn parhau â'r achau yn y cyfresi enwog gan Dr Peter Bartrum — Welsh Genealogies 300-1400 (WG 1) a Welsh Genealogies 1400-1500 (WG 2) — lawr i tua 1600, gan gynnwys llawer o bobl a anwyd yn y 1600au cynnar, ac y mae'n ychwanegu tua dau gant o deuluoedd newydd. Llanwodd WG 2 ddeunaw cyfrol fawr, a byddai WG 3 hyd yn oed yn hwy, pes cyhoeddid fel llyfr. Felly rhennir WG 3 rhwng y gyfrol argraffedig a disg yng nghefn y llyfr, gyda'r disgwyl y bydd y ddau'n cael eu defnyddio ochr yn ochr.
Cyhoeddwyd 2017

“Welsh Genealogies A.D. 1500-1600 continues the high standards set by Peter Bartrum and will undoubtedly be warmly welcomed by a wide range of scholars” — Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie

book cover

The Book of Taliesin is the most enigmatic and mysterious of the 'Four Ancient Books of Wales'. This volume at last offers the first authoritative introduction to the early Welsh poems associated with Taliesin, the legendary shape-changing bard.
Second, fully revised edition. Published 2015

“Written in an accessible and engaging style, free of both jargon and obscurity, it is comprehensive and will be on every medieval Welsh scholar's shelf - probably forever” — Folklore

book cover

In this sequel to her 'Legendary Poems from the Book of Taliesin' Professor Haycock edits, translates and interprets ten allusive poems that survey the past successes and failures of the Welsh people and foretell their final victory.
Published 2013

“A wonderful introduction for medievalists with different interests and from different disciplines” — Medium Aevum

book cover

The interests of Hector Munro Chadwick (1870-1947) branched out from Classical and Indo-European philology into pioneering interdisciplinary studies on archaeology, anthropology, numismatics, onomastics, history and comparative literature. His north-west European research extended from Scandinavia and Anglo-Saxon England into Celtic Britain and Ireland, and ultimately encompassed world literature in The Growth of Literature (1932-40), written jointly with Nora Kershaw Chadwick, a work which inspired writers as diverse as Maurice Bowra, Gerard Murphy and Máirtín Ó Cadhain. H. M. Chadwick and the Study of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic in Cambridge is a comprehensive study of Chadwick's work and an assessment of its lasting value, with specialist contributions by Michael Lapidge, Richard Dance, Margaret Clunies Ross, Simon Keynes, Rory Naismith, Oliver Padel, Patrick Sims-Williams, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh & Fiona Edmonds. Through fifty years of teaching in Cambridge, from 1895 to 1945, Chadwick inspired many generations of students, including E. C. Quiggin, Bertha Phillpotts, Bruce Dickins, J. M. de Navarro, Cyril Fox, Dorothy Whitelock, Hugh Hencken, Kenneth Jackson, Peter Hunter Blair, Glyn Daniel, Terence Powell, Rachel Bromwich and Mary Boyce. Many of them looked back on the years they spent with him “as the most valuable and formative years of their life” (Q. D. Leavis). Some of their reminiscences are included here, while Isabel Henderson describes her relations with Nora Chadwick between 1955 and 1967 and Michael Lapidge, in a 100-page contribution, takes the history of the ASNaC Department down to 1999, including photographs of the most significant figures. Read more >
Published 2015

“This is an informative collection of papers which reflects both the interdisciplinary nature of Chadwick's own work, and more generally that undertaken at the department at Cambridge in which he was so influential” — English Historical Review

book cover

Dates have been proposed for many medieval Welsh texts, from the 'Gododdin' to the 'Mabinogion', but few have gained general acceptance. Simon Rodway reconsiders the methodological problems, and discusses the role of linguistic evidence, in particular the evolution of the verbal system. He analyses a comprehensive collection of verbal forms from Middle Welsh poems by poets securely dated to the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and compares a complete collection of forms from the earliest surviving medieval Welsh prose manuscripts. On this basis he proposes approximate dates for a number of developments in Middle Welsh, providing a secure framework for the dating of anonymous texts. His study is an invaluable resource for medieval Welsh literary studies and will be an essential work of reference in Celtic historical linguistics. It will also appeal to scholars grappling with comparable problems in other medieval literatures, including the differences between the language of poetry and the language of prose. Read more >
Published 2013

“His competent and sensible treatment will become required reading, and further profits from instructive sidelights on related problems of the dating of medieval Irish texts, which evince Rodway's impressive command of Irish philology and literary studies” — Journal of Celtic Linguistics

book cover

This volume introduces a wide range of readers to an historically and sociologically interesting selection of 814 Latin inscriptions, from most parts of Europe, edited and translated in full for the first time. The inscriptions, mostly of the first to third centuries A.D., shed a varied light on the everyday life of the 'ancient Celts' as they came under Roman rule. They come from sites ranging from Portugal to Bulgaria and from Scotland to northern Italy.
Published 2007

“The authors have provided scholars of the ethnic makeup of the Roman Empire an admirable and much-needed tool for exploring the distribution of Celtic names throughout the Roman Europe” — Bryn Mawr Classical Review.

“… eine ausgezeichnete Quellengrundlage, die einer Vielzahl disziplinenübergreifender Forschungen dienlich sein wird” — Keltische Forschungen.

book cover

In this second volume Raybould & Sims- Williams complete their Corpus of Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire containing Celtic Personal Names with a final collection of texts and translations. They also list and analyse the Celtic names found in both volumes and map their geographical spread, from the Atlantic to the Black Sea. The illustration on the front cover shows part of a second-century tombstone in the museum at Mannersdorf am Leithagebirge, Austria (no. PAN 113 in this Supplement). Nertomarus and his wife Toutomara erected it to commemorate themselves. His name Nertomarus is from Celtic nerto- 'strength' and maros 'great' (compare medieval Irish nertmar and Welsh nerthfawr 'strong'), while Touto- mara combines touto- 'people, land' (Irish tuath, Welsh tud) with the feminine mara 'great'. Read more >
Published 2009

book cover

Proceedings of the XIIth International Congress of Celtic Studies, University of Wales, Aberystwyth (=CMCS vols.53/54).
Published 2007

book cover

Codex Cantabrigiensis — A Ninth-century Manuscript Glossed in Welsh, Irish and Latin. Facsimile edition.
Published 2000

book cover

An electronic database with etymological analysis of the Celtic name-elements, covering the ancient territories of Hibernia, Britannia, Hispania, Gallia, Germania, Raetia, Vindelicia, Noricum, Pannonia, Illyricum, Massiliotes, Liguria, Tusci, Gallia Cisalpina, Venetia, Istria, Sarmatia Europaea, Iazyges, Dacia, Moesia, Thracia, Chersonese, Pontus et Bithynia, Galatia [including Place-Names in the Antonine Itinerary as an appendix]. Windows- and Macintosh-compatible CD-ROM.
Published 2004

“Un travail très utile et intéressant” — Nouvelle Revue d'Onomastique.